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Call for Papers, Journal Special Issue

Call for Papers: Special Issue of CALICO Journal
Title: Emergency Remote Language Teaching and Learning: Computer-Assisted Language Teaching and Learning in Disruptive Times

Co-editors: Li Jin (DePaul University), Elizabeth Deifell (University of Dubuque), and Katie Angus (University of Southern Mississippi)

This special issue of the CALICO Journal is intended to explore various aspects of emergency remote language teaching and learning, which refers to temporary alternatives to face-to-face and hybrid courses during times of crisis (Hodges et al., 2020). Such crises include pandemics, natural disasters, sociopolitical turbulence, and other states of chronic and extended distress. Contributions will expand theoretical horizons, report on targeted empirical research, and explore innovative approaches to emergency remote language teaching and learning. The editors seek contributions from researchers and educators that examine and reflect on the processes and outcomes of computer-assisted language teaching and learning during disruptive times as well as the short- and long-term impact on language education after a crisis.

Content areas for contributions include – but are not limited to – the following:

  1. Theoretical considerations exploring the unique contexts of language teaching and learning in times of crisis;

  2. Technology-related empirical research examining L2 development and (inter)cultural learning; instructor and student perspectives and experiences; and the effectiveness of faculty training;

  3. Critical reflections on curriculum and pedagogical innovations as well as implications for language teacher education and professional development with regards to computer-assisted language learning;

This special issue will strive to maintain the format of past CALICO Journal Special Issues while also supporting diverse contribution formats. We encourage full-length (approximately 6,000–8,000 words, all inclusive) conceptual/theoretical contributions and empirical studies (e.g., mixed methods, case studies, action research). Authors are strongly encouraged to contextualize their contribution within appropriate theoretical and developmental frameworks.

Empirical studies are particularly encouraged and critical review pieces are also welcome. However, please note that manuscripts that are purely descriptive as well as those which rely primarily on surveys without providing systematic and compelling empirical data and analysis will not be considered.

Any questions about the volume should be addressed to volume co-editors: Li Jin (Ljin2@depaul.edu), Elizabeth Deifell (elizabeth@deifell.com), and Katie Angus (katie.angus@usm.edu). Please write “CALICO Journal Special Issue” in the subject line.

Submission deadline for abstracts is October 1, 2020.

●  Submit an abstract of no more than 400 words to the volume editors at ljin2@depaul.edu, elizabeth@deifell.com, and katie.angus@usm.edu.

●  In your abstract, please state clearly if your proposal should be reviewed as (A) theoretical, (B) empirical, or (C) pedagogical.

●  Full-length manuscript invitations will be sent out by October 15, 2020.

●  Full-length manuscripts will be due February 15, 2021, and must comply with CALICO’s authoring guidelines (found here).

●  Full-length final draft of manuscripts will be due August 1, 2021.

Special Issue to be published in February 2022 (39.1). Please note that abstract acceptance does not guarantee publication of the submitted manuscript. All manuscripts will be subject to a double-blind peer review process.

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Call for Chapter Proposals, Book Series

CALICO Book Series: Advances in CALL Research and Practice (https://calico.org/book-series/)

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSALS

2022 CALICO Book Title: IDENTITY, MULTILINGUALISM, AND CALL Chapter Proposals due – August 1, 2020
Guest Editor: Liudmila Klimanova, Ph.D.

Interest in digital multilingual identity in the fields of applied linguistics and language education has been growing exponentially in recent years, encompassing new variables and realities of life, such as translanguaging, heightened multilingualism, linguistic superdiversity, multimodal computer-mediated communication, and even social justice and forensics (e.g., Chiang & Grant, 2018; Grant & Macleod, 2016). New theoretical assumptions and recent global challenges urge us to problematize the construct of virtual identity (Kramsch, 2009) in the face of globalization, increased virtual connectedness, and the hybridizing of transcultural and translingual practices and intersecting physical movements of people (Canagarajah, 2013; De Costa & Norton, 2016; Higgins, 2011). Singling out identity research within the field of computer- assisted language learning (CALL) is particularly critical in the era of hyperlingualism, a form of multilingualism characterized by the increased participatory nature of digital communication and the provision of multiple languages in digital contexts, leading to “a kind of hyper-differentiation in relation to language, whereby more and more languages are achieving their own bounded spaces and places of use on the web and in other digital contexts” (Kelly-Homes, 2019, p. 31).

This volume will contribute to this new body of interdisciplinary research, featuring theoretical papers and research studies of identity performance and multilingual communication in institutional and cross-cultural computer-mediated social environments. Of particular significance to the field of multilingual CALL are critical issues associated with informal language learning, and learner identification ‘in the wilds” – digital contexts or virtual communities that are not governed by a formally recognized educational provider (Sauro & Zourou, 2019).

The editors invite chapter proposals on a range of topics and empirical contributions that address these and related lines of inquiry connected to critical pedagogies, intercultural education, monolingual hegemonies in virtual spaces and social networks, learner and teacher identities, multimodal and multilingual identity performances and linguistic inequality in digital social spaces. In particular, we seek original

submissions that present diverse theoretically grounded and methodologically rigorous empirical studies in CALL, focusing on the study of multilingual identity and self-concept in virtual interaction. Studies may include, but are not limited, to the following:

  • New theoretical approaches to the study of hyperlingualism (as a new form of multilingualism) and identity in CALL contexts;

  • Conceptual chapters that address new methodological approaches for researching digital identity and multilingualism in CALL;

  • Empirical research on the intersection of multilingualism\hyperlingualism\ideolingualism and identity performance in digital environments;

  • Classroom-based research studies of teacher and learner positioning and identity enactment in instructional digitally-mediated language learning contexts;

  • Impact of multilingualism on intercultural education.

Submission Guidelines:
Potential authors should provide a chapter proposal and a brief bio. The proposal should be detailed enough to provide a clear idea of the content of the full chapter. Full chapter submissions of 6,000 – 8,500 words will be due on January 15, 2021. For questions, contact 2022 CALICO Book Guest Editor, Liudmila Klimanova (klimanova@arizona.edu).

What to include in the chapter proposal:

  1. Tentative chapter title
  2. 75-100 word biographical statement for each author (job title, department, university name, university location plus any research interests or recent publications)
  3. 350-500 word abstract:
    1. overview of the key idea, issue or research question
    2. relationship of the key idea or issue to the thesis of the book theme
    3. potential implications and audience

Send your chapter proposal as a MS Word document via email by August 1, 2020 to calico2022volume@gmail.com. Please note that abstract acceptance does not guarantee publication of the submitted manuscript. All manuscripts will be subject to a double-blind peer review process.

Production Timeline:

  • August 1, 2020 – chapter proposals/expression of interest due
  • August 15, 2020 – notifications to authors
  • January 15, 2021 – full chapters due (6,000 – 8,500 words)
  • March 15, 2021 – double blind peer reviews sent to authors
  • June 15, 2021 – revised chapters due
  • July 1, 2021 – full volume sent to Publisher
  • Spring 2022 – anticipated publication

References

Canagarajah, A. S. (2013). Translingual practice: global Englishes and cosmopolitan relations. Routledge.
Chiang, E. & Grant, T. (2018). Deceptive identity performance: Offender moves and multiple identities in online child abuse conversations. Applied Linguistics, 1-25.
Grant, T., & Macleod, N. (2016). Assuming identities online: Experimental linguistics applied to the policing of online pedophile activity. Applied Linguistics, 37(1), 50-70.
De Costa, P., & Norton, B. (2016). Identity in language learning and teaching. Research agendas for the future. In S. Preece. (Ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Language and Identity. Routledge.
Domingo, M. (2016). Language and identity research in online environments. A multimodal ethnographic perspective. In S. Preece (Ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Language and Identity. Routledge
Higgins, C. (2011). Identity formation in globalized contexts: language learning in the new millennium. Mouton de Gruyter.
Kelly-Holmes, H. (2019). Multilingualism and technology: A review of developments in digital communication from monolingualism to idiolingualism. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 39, 24-39.
Kramsch, C. (2009). The multilingual subject: What foreign language learners say about their experience and why it matters. Oxford University Press.
Sauro, S., & Zourou, K. (2019). What are the digital wilds? Language Learning & Technology, 23(1), 1–7.

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Special Interest Group Newsletters

For those of you interested in specific types of computer-assisted language learning, you might want to take a minute and look through CALICO’s special interest groups and see if you’d like to join one or more of them.

Here are a couple of newsletters recently published by the Graduate Student SIG and the Virtual Worlds SIG

Graduate Student SIG Newsletter May 2020

Virtual Worlds Newsletter June 2020

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Annual Award Winners

Three awards are presented each year: Access to Language Education, Outstanding Graduate Student and Best Article

This year’s Access to Language Education Award, in association with the Esperantic Studies Foundation, was awarded to Qing Ma Angel and team for their website The Corpus-Aided Platform for Language Teachers (CAP)

This year’s Robert A. Fischer Outstanding Graduate Student Award was given to Margherita Berti of the University of Arizona.

And last but not least, an award was given for Best Article in the CALICO Journal for Volume 36 to Lara Lomicka Anderson and Fabrizio Fornara: Using Visual Social Media in Language Learning to Investigate the Role of Social Presence

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Call for Proposals, Journal Special Issue

 

 

 

Call for proposals: CALICO Journal special issue

We are inviting proposals for the special issue 39.1 of the CALICO Journal to be published in February 2022. With this call for proposals we are looking for (a) guest editor(s). If you are interested in becoming guest editor, please submit a proposal that should have the following rubrics:

(1) name(s) and affiliation(s) of the guest editor(s)

(2) topic of the special issue

(3) rationale for the topic

(4) production timeline (containing such dates as deadlines for CfPs, authors, reviewers, revisions. All revisions to accepted manuscripts must be completed by 8/15/2021).

(5) short CV of each guest editor (with particular emphasis on published research on the topic of the special issue and editing experience)

(6) draft Call for Papers for the special issue

All proposals will be evaluated by CJ’s editorial board.

Initial expressions of interest and informal enquiries can be sent to the editors Ana Oskoz and Bryan Smith at calicojournal@equinoxpub.com by May 30th. The submission deadline for formal proposals is June 15, 2020

The special issues of the CALICO Journal present original research on emerging discourses in CALL and on new developments in its sub-areas. Recent and planned special issues of the CALICO Journal include:

  • CJ 37.2 (2021): Innovation and Creation: Harnessing the Maker Movement in CALL (Lord, G., & Dubreil, S.)
  • CJ 37.1 (2020): Exploring the Interface of Interlanguage (L2) Pragmatics and Digital Spaces (Sykes, J., & Gonzalez-Lloret, M.)
  • CJ 36.1 (2019): Promoting Social Justice with CALL (Gleason, J., & Suvorov, R.)
  • CJ 34.1 (2017): Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) in Extracurricular /Extramural Contexts (Sylvén, L., & Sundquist, P.)
  • CJ 33.1 (2016): Automated writing evaluation in language teaching (Hegelheimer, W., Dursun, A., & Li, Z.)

 

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E-BOOK SALE

Our publication partner Equinox is offering big e-book discounts

now through May 31 to CALICO members.

CALICO’s Book Series, Advances in CALL Research and Practice @ Equinox Publishing

For this newest book in CALICO’s book series, Equinox is offering a 40% discount when you use the members-only code.

 

For all other books in the series, a 25% discount for members with a code.

Contact Esther or check your email for a message from the members list to get your codes now.

Also on sale now the very informative earlier books in this series, found in the CALICO Shop

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President Message Conference Cancellation

Dear CALICO colleagues,

On behalf of the CALICO Board, it is with regret that we notify our membership and other potential conference goers that we must cancel our 2020 conference (May 25-29, 2020) at the Renaissance Downtown Seattle. We are sad to miss the community networking, sharing of knowledge, and camaraderie that the conference normally offers every year. We are planning next year’s conference already and will have more information to share soon regarding guaranteed presentation slots for those invited to present this year. If you have made reservations at the hotel, you can cancel directly with them, and if you have already registered for the conference, we will refund your registration. 

On a happier note, we will still be able to have several of the workshops online, and will send a revised schedule to members soon. We will also hold a general meeting online early June, where we will announce a few new exciting initiatives for members. 

Our thoughts are with all who are impacted by the pandemic around the world, especially those close to the illness. Those of us who can shelter in place, teach online, and work effectively from home are fortunate, and we are grateful that our professional community remains strong in these tough times. We hope you and yours stay safe and healthy, and we look forward to seeing everyone in person next year. 

Best, 

Jon Reinhardt

CALICO President

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Election Results 2020

Thank you to everyone who took a moment to cast your vote over the last few weeks to elect two new members of our executive board and our new vice president.  The nominees receiving the most votes this year are:

Lisa Frumkes and Liudmila Klimanova for the two open executive board positions and Randall Sadler for Vice President.

They will all officially take their positions at the conclusion of this year’s conference and serve three-year terms.  Feel free to contact them or anyone else on the board or in a presidential position if you should have any questions or concerns.  See our boards and staff page for historical and current members of these positions.