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Welcome to the Team, New Book Series Editor

My pleasure to announce that Steph Link is our new Book Series Editor.  A huge thank you to Greg Kessler, our previous book series editor, for all of his work these years!  Welcome to Steph who has been a CALICOer now for quite a while and familiar to most of you.  We look forward to working more with you.

See also our call for proposals for the next book series book.

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Call for proposals: Spring 2024 Book Series Volume

CALICO is now soliciting proposals for the next volume in the Advances in CALL Research and Practice book series to be published with Equinox Publishing in spring 2024! 

The volume may be a single-authored monograph or edited volume and may treat any topic related to the field of CALL. Proposals are due July 15. You can find the full call at this link

You can also email series editor, Steph Link (steph.link@okstate.edu), with questions or meet her at the CALICO conference in Seattle to talk through some ideas. 

Looking forward to seeing your proposals!

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New Issue of the Journal

VOL 39, NO 1 (2022)

Special Issue: Emergency Remote Language Teaching and Learning in Disruptive Times

Guest Edited by Li Jin, Elizabeth Deifell, and Katie Angus

Table of Contents

Editorial

Emergency Remote Language Teaching and Learning in Disruptive Times 
Li Jin , Elizabeth Deifell , Katie Angus

Articles

When “Blended” Becomes “Online” : A Data-Driven Study on the Change of Self- Directed Engagement During COVID-19
Dennis Foung , Julia Chen , Linda Lin
Connecting Through Flipgrid : Examining Social Presence of English Language Learners in an Online Course During the Pandemic
Ellen Yeh , Grace Y. Choi , Yonty Friesem
Pivoting, Partnering, and Sensemaking : How Teachers Navigate the Transition to Remote Teaching Together
Jillian M. Conry , Ann M. Wernick , Paige Ware
“Siempre Adistanciados” : Ideology, Equity, and Access in Peruvian Emergency Distance Education for Spanish as a Second Language
Michele Back , Virginia Zavala , Raiza Franco

Book Reviews

Academic Writing with Corpora: A Resource Book for Data-Driven Learning by Tatyana Karpenko-Seccombe
J. Elliott Casal
Creating Effective Blended Language Learning Courses: A Research-Based Guide from Planning to Evaluation by Daria Mizza and Fernando Rubio
Kathryn Murphy-Judy
Open Education and Second Language Learning and Teaching: The Rise of a New Knowledge Ecology edited by Carl S. Blyth and Joshua J. Thoms
Ananda Astrini Muhammad

Learning Technology Reviews

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Call for Chapter Proposals, Book Series

CALICO Book Series: Advances in CALL Research and Practice (https://calico.org/book-series/)

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSALS

2022 CALICO Book Title: IDENTITY, MULTILINGUALISM, AND CALL Chapter Proposals due – August 1, 2020
Guest Editor: Liudmila Klimanova, Ph.D.

Interest in digital multilingual identity in the fields of applied linguistics and language education has been growing exponentially in recent years, encompassing new variables and realities of life, such as translanguaging, heightened multilingualism, linguistic superdiversity, multimodal computer-mediated communication, and even social justice and forensics (e.g., Chiang & Grant, 2018; Grant & Macleod, 2016). New theoretical assumptions and recent global challenges urge us to problematize the construct of virtual identity (Kramsch, 2009) in the face of globalization, increased virtual connectedness, and the hybridizing of transcultural and translingual practices and intersecting physical movements of people (Canagarajah, 2013; De Costa & Norton, 2016; Higgins, 2011). Singling out identity research within the field of computer- assisted language learning (CALL) is particularly critical in the era of hyperlingualism, a form of multilingualism characterized by the increased participatory nature of digital communication and the provision of multiple languages in digital contexts, leading to “a kind of hyper-differentiation in relation to language, whereby more and more languages are achieving their own bounded spaces and places of use on the web and in other digital contexts” (Kelly-Homes, 2019, p. 31).

This volume will contribute to this new body of interdisciplinary research, featuring theoretical papers and research studies of identity performance and multilingual communication in institutional and cross-cultural computer-mediated social environments. Of particular significance to the field of multilingual CALL are critical issues associated with informal language learning, and learner identification ‘in the wilds” – digital contexts or virtual communities that are not governed by a formally recognized educational provider (Sauro & Zourou, 2019).

The editors invite chapter proposals on a range of topics and empirical contributions that address these and related lines of inquiry connected to critical pedagogies, intercultural education, monolingual hegemonies in virtual spaces and social networks, learner and teacher identities, multimodal and multilingual identity performances and linguistic inequality in digital social spaces. In particular, we seek original

submissions that present diverse theoretically grounded and methodologically rigorous empirical studies in CALL, focusing on the study of multilingual identity and self-concept in virtual interaction. Studies may include, but are not limited, to the following:

  • New theoretical approaches to the study of hyperlingualism (as a new form of multilingualism) and identity in CALL contexts;

  • Conceptual chapters that address new methodological approaches for researching digital identity and multilingualism in CALL;

  • Empirical research on the intersection of multilingualism\hyperlingualism\ideolingualism and identity performance in digital environments;

  • Classroom-based research studies of teacher and learner positioning and identity enactment in instructional digitally-mediated language learning contexts;

  • Impact of multilingualism on intercultural education.

Submission Guidelines:
Potential authors should provide a chapter proposal and a brief bio. The proposal should be detailed enough to provide a clear idea of the content of the full chapter. Full chapter submissions of 6,000 – 8,500 words will be due on January 15, 2021. For questions, contact 2022 CALICO Book Guest Editor, Liudmila Klimanova (klimanova@arizona.edu).

What to include in the chapter proposal:

  1. Tentative chapter title
  2. 75-100 word biographical statement for each author (job title, department, university name, university location plus any research interests or recent publications)
  3. 350-500 word abstract:
    1. overview of the key idea, issue or research question
    2. relationship of the key idea or issue to the thesis of the book theme
    3. potential implications and audience

Send your chapter proposal as a MS Word document via email by August 1, 2020 to calico2022volume@gmail.com. Please note that abstract acceptance does not guarantee publication of the submitted manuscript. All manuscripts will be subject to a double-blind peer review process.

Production Timeline:

  • August 1, 2020 – chapter proposals/expression of interest due
  • August 15, 2020 – notifications to authors
  • January 15, 2021 – full chapters due (6,000 – 8,500 words)
  • March 15, 2021 – double blind peer reviews sent to authors
  • June 15, 2021 – revised chapters due
  • July 1, 2021 – full volume sent to Publisher
  • Spring 2022 – anticipated publication

References

Canagarajah, A. S. (2013). Translingual practice: global Englishes and cosmopolitan relations. Routledge.
Chiang, E. & Grant, T. (2018). Deceptive identity performance: Offender moves and multiple identities in online child abuse conversations. Applied Linguistics, 1-25.
Grant, T., & Macleod, N. (2016). Assuming identities online: Experimental linguistics applied to the policing of online pedophile activity. Applied Linguistics, 37(1), 50-70.
De Costa, P., & Norton, B. (2016). Identity in language learning and teaching. Research agendas for the future. In S. Preece. (Ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Language and Identity. Routledge.
Domingo, M. (2016). Language and identity research in online environments. A multimodal ethnographic perspective. In S. Preece (Ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Language and Identity. Routledge
Higgins, C. (2011). Identity formation in globalized contexts: language learning in the new millennium. Mouton de Gruyter.
Kelly-Holmes, H. (2019). Multilingualism and technology: A review of developments in digital communication from monolingualism to idiolingualism. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 39, 24-39.
Kramsch, C. (2009). The multilingual subject: What foreign language learners say about their experience and why it matters. Oxford University Press.
Sauro, S., & Zourou, K. (2019). What are the digital wilds? Language Learning & Technology, 23(1), 1–7.